Welcome to Funny Games

Play top FREE games daily
Register Now

what military branch....

Discussion in 'Intelligent Discussion' started by SexyGirl64, Jun 25, 2014.

  1. SexyGirl64

    SexyGirl64 Shit happens...just live

    19
    4
    3
    What military branch should I join? I want something where I can travel and be a useful part in war times but I DO NOT want a desk job at all!!! Help please I'm so very confused on what I want to do in the miltary. Also if you don't mind when you write your reply please state if your in a military branch and if so which one, it'll help keep this from being biased. :)
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 25, 2014
    Zaadin19 likes this.
  2. Zaadin19

    Zaadin19 Purple People Eater

    6
    2
    3
    This thread is so old but I'm going to reply anyways. More than likely, you've joined some form of military by now... or have not at all, but that's not the point. When it comes to joining the military, no matter what branch you end up in, it isn't a matter of what you get out of it. Its a matter of what you can give to it. Many go into the military for a four year stint to have their college tuitions paid for, which isn't a bad idea as it can be helpful and many veterans have skills the military taught them that are invaluable in a learning/working environment... but that's not the point of a military. The point of the military is to do something for your country, selflessly. Either to protect it or to fight it's enemies. You join the military to make your country or the world a better place.

    The military isn't a set of cloths you can put on and take off whenever you like. There's reasons why people say "Once a Marine, always a Marine". It changes you forever, be it for good or for bad. The military, no matter which branch you go for, is a career path. Yes, it has benefits and it isn't impossible to get into, like becoming a brain surgeon or nuclear physicist, but it does require the same level of dedication and effort.

    With the philosophical parts out of the way, let's talk logistics, benefits and downsides. Also, right about here is where I should point out that I'm a military spouse and am not in the military myself. My wife is and I love her for it. Take the following with a grain of salt as this is from what I've observed personally from watching her and family friends.
     
  3. Zaadin19

    Zaadin19 Purple People Eater

    6
    2
    3
    Logistically, there are more "desk jobs" than there are any other type. Not wanting a "desk job" is fine, but logistically, you'll end up in one unless you get some damn good scores on their tests. That's just the way things go. For every soldier in the field overseas, there are at least a dozen back home. Everything from supply to management to maintenance and so on. These jobs are no less important than holding a gun, shooting at enemies of your country, but I understand if you don't want to do them.

    Benefits wise, there are a lot of benefits. TriCare handles all your insurance needs, not just for you, but for your dependents and spouse. You personally, never have to pay a penny for your healthcare or dental work. You'll even get surgeries you need to function properly done. Though I don't agree with it, if you make a valid argument, you can even get a sex change though from what I've heard that's going to go away. All you have to do is go through the correct channels and you'll be on your way to getting done what you need, though you should be aware that having a drug dependence or developing a drug dependence can spell an end to your career. Another benefit is access to certain services that are common on bases, such as Commissaries- which are grocery stores that carry the same products as normal stores but do not charge any form of tax- and Exchanges, which are your other kinds of stores that most often don't carry food- also without taxing you. You get access to gas stations that don't charge tax on gasoline, but depending on the base, the gas can be more expensive. You gotta pay attention. Besides those, your dependents, such as children or parents that live with you, can get passes that allow them on bases to access those stores and such, with also the added benefit of being covered to a certain degree by TriCare. It isn't total coverage like what you'll have, but it is definitely better than other insurance, and you don't have to pay for it. For women, there's Maternity Leave when you're about to have your baby and after you've had your child that is incredibly nice. A year and a half ago it was three or six months, I can't remember which. Oh and there's Basic Allowance for Housing too, which is literally the military paying you to rent or own a home off base. There's even Military Housing, entire suburbs of military communities where you get many basic utilities for free at the cost of the majority of your BAH. These are just some of the benefits you'll find and I'm sure each branch has specific benefits to being in them. Oh and being a Veteran comes with some civilian perks too, but that's not really tied to the military. That's just businesses being nice.
     
  4. Zaadin19

    Zaadin19 Purple People Eater

    6
    2
    3
    Now for the part you were expecting, the downsides. Its fucking hard. Yeah, that's the big one. It is not easy being in any branch of the military. Yeah, there are some days where it will be easier than most, but those are rare. Long hours are something you'll face commonly. From what I understand, the Marines work two shifts- Days and Nights. Twelve hours on, twelve off. In the Navy, getting deployed on a ship means those exact same shifts, but with no days off for months. I've no idea what its like for the Air Force and Army, as I've no friends in the Air Force and my grandfather was the only person I know that's been in the Army... and he died in 2000, so I can't just ask him. However, I imagine it is much the same. The next thing to think about is the level of physical fitness required is- while not totally constant- is generally consistent. The shape you get into in boot camp (I'll talk more about boot camp in a second) is not necessarily the shape you have to stay in, but damn it is close. There are Physical Fitness Exams that happen every now and then that if you fail, can get you processed out. These exams include weigh-ins and, if necessary, taping. It's to make sure you're combat ready at any time. For single people, this is really easy to keep up, seeing as you have gyms on base you can go to for free, but from what I've seen from couples- especially women, it is a lot harder. Its easy to tell yourself no. Its not easy to tell your spouse no. For women, there's the months after pregnancy. If I remember correctly, you do not have to deal with PFAs or Weigh-ins at all during pregnancy but afterwards you have a year to get back into shape. After that year, you almost immediately do a PFA and Weigh-in and if you fail... well you're not far off from failing again and being processed out. They do have programs to help you shed the baby weight, but you have to be serious about it and go about it the correct way. Slightly off topic, it turns out you can actually fuck your body up by exercising too hard too soon after a baby and permanently screw yourself over. Talk to your damn doctor, okay? Anyways, there's also things like Qualifications that you have to stay up on which more often than not, do not carry over to different Commands. Speaking of different Commands, there's also things like changing commands, where you go from one command at one base to another command. You could stay in the same base if its big enough or you could find yourself moving across the country. You can work with certain members of your command to increase your chances of your next set of orders keeping you in one place or moving you to the next, but more often than not it is a crap shoot. If you stay single, you could be looking at moving every time you get new orders... which could be anywhere between two and four times in four years. It costs more to move a family, so they tend to stay in one place... but that is not always the case. My wife's father was in the Navy and he had to move himself, his wife, and their four children roughly eight times in his career. Another downside that isn't often talked about or addressed is one that doesn't really have a name but I'll call it combat ready for funsies. Basically, you can't go a certain distance away from your base- period- unless you fill out certain forms and follow specific regulations. Yeah, that means you're not leaving the country unless you're wearing a uniform and getting ready to put boots to ground.

    Now I put it off for a long while here but its time to talk about Boot Camp, but before we can talk about Boot Camp, we have to talk about Recruitment. Its not as simple as walking in and being like "I want to join". If it were, everyone who wanted to get in would be in. Its like any other job interview. You dress your best, you talk to a guy or gal who is going to lie to you while smiling, then you either leave with a job or you don't. Yes, that's right, sometimes, depending on who you get as your Recruiter, you may be lied to. You may be led to believe something is one way but in truth it is another. It depends entirely upon the Recruiter and their mood that day. Remember, they were once normal people just like you and they may have been lied to as well. Its a horrid cycle that just feeds itself. If, by chance, they decide to take you on, you need to know what you want to do. Almost specifically know what you want to do... otherwise you could end up listed as "Needs of the (insert military branch)" which will give you any job that needs bodies. So you could be a soldier getting shot at, or a pencil pusher working in supply.
     
    Last edited: Nov 2, 2017
  5. Zaadin19

    Zaadin19 Purple People Eater

    6
    2
    3
    On to Boot Camp. So you got accepted, you passed the tests and such, now you're thrown into what will be the hardest three months of your life- and that's not including any of the 'schools' you have to go into after to learn the job you were volun-told to do. You'll be subjected to little sleep, little personal space, little privacy and from what I've heard, awful food. Not that you'll have the time or energy to care about any of those things, because the second you try, you'll have to do something that will take your mind off it. You will get yelled at, you will be ordered to do things you don't want to do, but you'll take it with your head held high because anything less and you'll get yelled at more and ordered more. Of those three months though, there is a single week where you will regret ever being born, and that is Hell Week. You thought you had little sleep before? You slept like a baby compared to this. You thought you had to push yourself hard before? Bitch please, that was nothing. Yeah, it sounds terrifying, and it is personally the reason I do not dive into the military myself. I would not survive that week because I know myself and how weak I can be, not just physically but emotionally and mentally as well. Who knows, maybe I'd surprise myself, but just being afraid to take that step is enough to keep me from joining.

    Finally, the last downsides to talk about are really the most disappointing. You will not be paid comparable to the effort you put in, you can get 'dishonorably discharged', you can go your entire career without getting promoted, you can be physically and/or emotionally wounded to a degree that you never recover fully from, there are too many people who will never respect you for the sacrifices you make for them and once you do get out, there is an insanely high probability that you will never get another job again and end up homeless. These are sad realities for any looking to join the military.

    Because of all the before mentioned benefits and because it costs billions for the military to do pretty much anything, it can not afford to pay you what you're worth until you're waaaaaay up in the ranks and even then, its more of an apology for the years you struggled.

    A dishonorable discharge is the worst way to get out of any of the military branches and is a black mark that basically ensures that you'll never do anything else with your life, as it should be.

    When I say you can go your entire career without getting promoted, I mean it. If you don't pass the tests, you don't get the promotions. If you don't pass often enough, you get processed out. (Being Processed Out is more like being Laid Off. Not good or bad. Just meh. Its how most that get 'kicked out' end up... kicked out.)

    As a soldier on the battlefield, you can and probably will get shot at and you can and will probably shoot someone. You may get killed, and you may kill. You could take a wrong step and set off a Improvised Explosive Device and get yourself and your squad severely injured or straight up killed. You could get pecked off from a thousand yards away by a sniper. You might be just in the mess tent, eating a meal with your buddies and a civie you trusted might walk in with a bomb strapped to their chest. If somehow you manage to live through any of that, there's the psychological damage to think about as well as the physical injuries. You think a soldier wanted to get their legs blown off? You can't begin to imagine what they feel when they look in the mirror, what they think about when they see their limbs missing or the scars that make them 'ugly'. In truth, right now, PTSD (Post Traumatic Stress Disorder) is not even viewed by the entire military as being a legit illness. I have heard that you can get psychological help in the Army, but I don't know for sure about that. I know for a fact that the Navy does not currently. However, that's just as a soldier on the battlefield. There are plenty of good men and women back home that get injured on the job. No one is okay when a helicopter crashes, or has a ten pound wrench dropped on them from the top of an aircraft. Hell, I hear that more pilots die trying to land on an aircraft carrier than anything else and that doesn't even require them to be outside US controlled waters!

    There are many people who will never respect what you do for this country, or what you've sacrificed. They wont care that you lost a limb fighting overseas, or ever even understand that they can be total cunt bags only because you and good men and women like you are fighting to keep those that want to take those rights away from doing just that. Its downright disgusting how Active Duty and Veterans are treated. Hell, even The Reserve deserves some respect.

    And finally, the saddest downside of all, is that once you get out, there is a high statistical probability that you will never hold another job again. It doesn't always end up with homelessness or suicide, but it is a damn shame when it does. For some, going from the strict regulations of being military of any branch to being a civilian is completely crippling. Civilian jobs are just too different. If you add on PTSD or a lost limb, you're looking at an even worse outlook. Yes, every single branch of the United States military has programs to help you adjust... but you have to attend them. You have to want to adjust and put in the effort. You have to want to make it work and put in the effort. But sometimes wanting and effort just aren't enough. A loud sound, an off look, and suddenly you react like you're back in the mess of things and civilians can't handle that. Sitting with my father-in-law and listening to him talk about his years in and the time after, I'm even more proud of him for managing to make it work and that was over thirty years ago!

    ...So with all of that said, with that whole speech done, I am pretty sure there are things I forgot to mention or things I can't mention. I'm sure there's unanswered questions y'all have, so I implore you to ask them. I'll answer any that I can to the best of my abilities. Thank you for taking the time to read this, and God bless America.
     
  6. Zaadin19

    Zaadin19 Purple People Eater

    6
    2
    3
    Some minor corrections!
    • The Tricare perks of covering your dependents is a Navy only perk.
    • The food in boot camp isn't that bad.
    • I was completely false about the PTSD. You can totally get the help you need and it is seen as a valid issue.
     

Share This Page